Law

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Principles of Management
Principles of Management
Collaborative Curriculum Design for Sustainable Innovation and Teacher Learning
Collaborative Curriculum Design for Sustainable Innovation and Teacher Learning
History Education and Conflict Transformation: Social Psychological Theories, History Teaching and Reconciliation
History Education and Conflict Transformation: Social Psychological Theories, History Teaching and Reconciliation
Modern Mathematics Education for Engineering Curricula in Europe:A Comparative Analysis of EU, Russia, Georgia and Armenia
Modern Mathematics Education for Engineering Curricula in Europe:A Comparative Analysis of EU, Russia, Georgia and Armenia

This open access book provides a comprehensive overview of the core subjects comprising mathematical curricula for engineering studies in five European countries and identifies differences between two strong traditions of teaching mathematics to engineers. The collective work of experts from a dozen universities critically examines various aspects of higher mathematical education.

The two EU Tempus-IV projects – MetaMath and MathGeAr – investigate the current methodologies of mathematics education for technical and engineering disciplines. The projects aim to improve the existing mathematics curricula in Russian, Georgian and Armenian universities by introducing modern technology-enhanced learning (TEL) methods and tools, as well as by shifting the focus of engineering mathematics education from a purely theoretical tradition to a more applied paradigm.

MetaMath and MathGeAr have brought together mathematics educators, TEL specialists and experts in education quality assurance form 21 organizations across six countries. The results of a comprehensive comparative analysis of the entire spectrum of mathematics courses in the EU, Russia, Georgia and Armenia has been conducted, have allowed the consortium to pinpoint and introduce several modifications to their curricula while preserving the generally strong state of university mathematics education in these countriesThe book presents the methodology, procedure and results of this analysis.

This book is a valuable resource for teachers, especially those teaching mathematics, and curriculum planners for engineers, as well as for a general audience interested in scientific and technical higher education.


Subject Education-
Author Seppo PohjolainenTuomas MyllykoskiChristian MercatSergey Sosnovsky
Published February 2, 2018
Higher Education in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Higher Education in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Computational Thinking Education
Computational Thinking Education
Rethinking Productivity in Software Engineering
Rethinking Productivity in Software Engineering
The Art of Insight in Science and Engineering : Mastering Complexity
The Art of Insight in Science and Engineering : Mastering Complexity
Engineering a Safer World : Systems Thinking Applied to Safety
Engineering a Safer World : Systems Thinking Applied to Safety

A new approach to safety, based on systems thinking, that is more effective, less costly, and easier to use than current techniques.Engineering has experienced a technological revolution, but the basic engineering techniques applied in safety and reliability engineering, created in a simpler, analog world, have changed very little over the years. In this groundbreaking book, Nancy Leveson proposes a new approach to safety—more suited to today's complex, sociotechnical, software-intensive world—based on modern systems thinking and systems theory. Revisiting and updating ideas pioneered by 1950s aerospace engineers in their System Safety concept, and testing her new model extensively on real-world examples, Leveson has created a new approach to safety that is more effective, less expensive, and easier to use than current techniques.Arguing that traditional models of causality are inadequate, Leveson presents a new, extended model of causation (Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes, or STAMP), then shows how the new model can be used to create techniques for system safety engineering, including accident analysis, hazard analysis, system design, safety in operations, and management of safety-critical systems. She applies the new techniques to real-world events including the friendly-fire loss of a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter in the first Gulf War; the Vioxx recall; the U.S. Navy SUBSAFE program; and the bacterial contamination of a public water supply in a Canadian town. Leveson's approach is relevant even beyond safety engineering, offering techniques for “reengineering” any large sociotechnical system to improve safety and manage risk.


Subject ICT-
Author Leveson, Nancy G.
Published October 3, 2016
The Essence of Software Engineering
The Essence of Software Engineering
Engineering a Better Future-Interplay between Engineering, Social Sciences, and Innovation
Engineering a Better Future-Interplay between Engineering, Social Sciences, and Innovation
Public Health Ethics: Cases Spanning the Globe
Public Health Ethics: Cases Spanning the Globe

During the 21st Century, public health ethics has become one of the fastest growing
subdisciplines of bioethics. This is the fi rst book series dedicated to the topic of
public health ethics. It aims to fi ll a gap in the existing literature by providing
thoroughgoing, book-length treatment of the most important topics in public health ethic—which have otherwise, for the most part, only been partially and/or sporadically addressed in journal articles, book chapters, or sections of volumes concerned with public health ethics. Books in the series will include coverage of central topics in public health ethics from a plurality of disciplinary perspectives including: philosophy (e.g., both ethics and philosophy of science), political science, history, economics, sociology, anthropology, demographics, law, human rights, epidemiology, and other public health sciences. Blending analytically rigorous and empirically informed analyses, the series will address ethical issues associated with the concepts, goals, and methods of public health; individual (e.g., ordinary citizens’
and public health workers’) decision making and behaviour; and public policy. Inter alia, volumes in the series will be dedicated to topics including: health promotion; disease prevention; paternalism and coercive measures; infectious disease; chronic disease; obesity; smoking and tobacco control; genetics; the environment; public communication/trust; social determinants of health; human rights; and justice. A primary priority is to produce volumes on hitherto neglected topics such as ethical issues associated with public health research and surveillance; vaccination; tuberculosis; malaria; diarrheal disease; lower respiratory infections; drug resistance; chronic disease in developing countries; emergencies/disasters (including bioterrorism); and public health implications of climate change.


Subject Medicine-
Author Drue H. Barrett, Leonard W. Ortmann Angus Dawson, Carla Saenz, Andreas Reis Gail Bolan (Editors)
Published May 3, 2016
Health and Wellbeing in Late Life Perspectives and Narratives from India
Health and Wellbeing in Late Life Perspectives and Narratives from India

It gives me immense pleasure to write this foreword to Dr. Prasun Chatterjee’s book
Health and Wellbeing in Late Life: Perspectives and Narratives from India. This
book will break a new ground in India as it is placed at a unique confluence of medical
knowledge and expertise and experiences of layman. Geriatric Medicine is a
relatively new discipline in India with only a few medical schools offering a postgraduate
training programme in this discipline. Dr. Prasun Chatterjee is a postgraduate
from the first department which started the programme in Madras Medical
College, Chennai. This discipline has now caught the attention of policy-makers
and planners in the health system. Geriatric Medicine post-graduation is now a
mandate of the National Programme for the Health Care for the Elderly, a flagship
programme of the Government of India.
Childhood and old age are two extreme stages of one’s lifespan where one
behaves differently from adulthood in terms of health status, profile of illness, management
strategies and response to the treatment. Sixty years ago, a similar debate
was going on as to how paediatrics was different from the adult medicine. But now
it is an established specialty of medicine, even though most of the illnesses are similar.
This development of paediatrics as a separate department and discipline was
also a response to a changed population structure. Geriatric Medicine is a response
to the rapid change in population structure towards an ageing population.
The inevitable structural and functional changes in the body increase the vulnerability
of the individual to multiple chronic diseases which are mostly noncommunicable
in nature. Altered drug handling and high risk of adverse drug reaction, functional decline to the extent of dependence on another individual, greater vulnerability to life-ending infections, etc. make an older individual’s health needs different from that of an adult. The complexity of health problems makes Geriatric Medicine the most difficult branch of medicine. Physical and socioeconomic dependence of older persons raises the issue of long-term care, which is a medico-social issue like infant and childhood mortality. In the face of rapid changes in function and structure of families in India, long-term care of older family members has become an epidemic-like situation. Long-term care is beyond the realms of curative adult medicine.


Subject Medicine-
Author Prasun Chatterjee
Published February 5, 2019
Making Medicines in Africa The Political Economy of Industrializing for Local Health
Making Medicines in Africa The Political Economy of Industrializing for Local Health

This book is a collective project. It was designed and debated in a workshop funded largely by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), in London in December 2014. We are grateful to UNIDO and to Juergen Reinhardt in particular for his support and encouragement. We also would like to thank the Open University and the Economic and Social Research Council, UK, for providing the funding that allowed this book to be published in open access form. The book draws extensively on original research and on direct experience
of involvement in policy making. Several chapters – and some of the broader framing of the book – have their origins in a research project on Industrial Productivity and Health Sector Performance, funded by the DFID/ESRC Growth Research Programme. The findings, interpretations,
conclusions and opinions expressed in the relevant chapters (identified in notes) are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of DFID or the UK ESRC. The views expressed throughout are the sole responsibility of the authors. When a number of contributors to this book began to work on the Industrial Productivity project in 2012, it is fair to say that the international policy debates on access to medicines in African countries
remained focused on funding procurement of essential medicines from Asian manufacturers. The project aimed to explore the scope for local developmental synergy between industrial development of pharmaceutical production on the Sub-Saharan African subcontinent
and improvement of the performance of health sectors suffering from chronic under supply of essential medicines. As we have worked on the project, we have become part of a much wider movement to identify and generate these synergies. This book is an outcome of this
networking, and we hope it will contribute to strengthening evidence, debate and policy making.


Subject Medicine-
Author Edited by Maureen Mackintosh, Geoffrey Banda ,Paula Tibandebage, Watu Wamae
Published July 5, 2016
Global Health Collaboration Challenges and Lessons
Global Health Collaboration Challenges and Lessons

SpringerBriefs in Public Health present concise summaries of cutting-edge research
and practical applications from across the entire field of public health, with
contributions from medicine, bioethics, health economics, public policy, biostatistics,
and sociology. The focus of the series is to highlight current topics in public health of interest to a global audience, including health care policy; social determinants of health; health issues in developing countries; new research methods; chronic and infectious
disease epidemics; and innovative health interventions. Featuring compact volumes of 50 to 125 pages, the series covers a range of content from professional to academic. Possible volumes in the series may consist of timely reports of state-of-the art analytical techniques, reports from the field, snapshots of hot and/or emerging topics, elaborated theses, literature reviews, and in-depth case studies. Both solicited and unsolicited manuscripts are considered for publication in this series. Briefs are published as part of Springer’s eBook collection, with millions of users worldwide. In addition, Briefs are available for individual print and electronic purchase. Briefs are characterized by fast, global electronic dissemination, standard publishing contracts, easy-to-use manuscript preparation and formatting guidelines,
and expedited production schedules. We aim for publication 8-12 weeks after acceptance.


Subject Medicine-
Author Margaret S. Winchester, Caprice A. Knapp and Rhonda BeLue (Editors)
Published April 16, 2018
AIDS, Intimacy and Care in Rural KwaZulu-Natal: A Kinship of Bones
AIDS, Intimacy and Care in Rural KwaZulu-Natal: A Kinship of Bones
Research for universal health coverage: World health report 2013
Research for universal health coverage: World health report 2013
Current Topics in Tropical Medicine
Current Topics in Tropical Medicine
Free Medical Information Doctor = Publisher
Free Medical Information Doctor = Publisher
Anatomy at a Glance
Anatomy at a Glance
The Legal Effects of EU Agreements
The Legal Effects of EU Agreements

Examining the legal effects of EU concluded treaties, this book provides an analysis of this increasingly important and rapidly growing area of EU law. The EU has concluded more than 1,000 treaties including recently its first human rights treaty (the UN Rights of Persons with Disability Convention). These agreements are regularly invoked in litigation in the Courts of the member states and before the EU courts in Luxembourg but their ramifications for the EU legal order and that of the member states remains underexplored. Through analysis of over 300 cases, the book finds evidence of a twin-track approach whereby the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) adopts a maximalist approach to Treaty enforcement, where EU agreements are invoked in challenges to member state level action whilst largely insulating EU action from meaningful review vis-à-vis agreements. The book also reveals novel findings regarding the use of EU agreements in EU level litigation including: the types and which specific EU agreements (including the types of provisions) have arisen in litigation; the nature of the proceedings (preliminary rulings or direct actions) and the number of occasions in which they have been addressed in challenges to member state or EU action and the outcomes; who has been litigating (individuals, institutions, or member states) and which domestic courts have been referring questions to the CJEU. The significance of the judicial developments in this area are situated within the context of the domestic constitutional ramifications for member state legal orders thus revealing a neglected dimension in the constitutionalization debates, which traditionally emphasized the ramifications of internal EU law for the domestic constitutional order without expressly accommodating the constitutional significance of this external category of EU law nor the different challenges that this poses domestically.


Subject Law-
Author Mendez Mario
Published April 3, 2013
Contemporary Issues in Human Rights Law
Contemporary Issues in Human Rights Law
One Billion Rising. Law, Land and the Alleviation of Global Poverty
One Billion Rising. Law, Land and the Alleviation of Global Poverty
Law, Liberty, And The Pursuit Of Terrorism
Law, Liberty, And The Pursuit Of Terrorism

It is commonly believed that a state facing a terrorist threat responds with severe legislation that compromises civil liberties in favour of national security. Roger Douglas compares responses to terrorism by five liberal democracies— the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand— over the past 15 years. He examines each nation’s development and implementation of counterterrorism law, specifically in the areas of information gathering, the definition of terrorist offenses, due process for the accused, detention, and torture and other forms of coercive questioning. Douglas finds that terrorist attacks elicit pressures for quick responses, which often allow national governments to accrue additional powers. But emergencies are neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for such laws, which may persist even after fears have eased. He argues that responses are influenced by institutional interests and prior beliefs and are complicated when the exigencies of office and beliefs point in different directions. He also argues that citizens are wary of government’s impingement on civil liberties and that courts exercise their capacity to restrain the legislative and executive branches. Douglas concludes that the worst anti-terror excesses have taken place outside of, rather than within, the law and that the legacy of 9/11 includes both laws that expand government powers and judicial decisions that limit those very powers. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.


Subject Law-
Author Douglas Roger
Published October 1, 2014
Applicable Law in Investor-State Arbitration: The Interplay Between National and International Law
Applicable Law in Investor-State Arbitration: The Interplay Between National and International Law

This book examines the law, national and/or international, that arbitral tribunals apply on the merits to settle disputes between foreign investors and host states. In light of the freedom that the disputing parties and the arbitrators have when designating the applicable law, and because of the hybrid nature of legal relationship between investors and states, there is significant interplay between the national and the international legal order in investor-state arbitration. The book contains a comprehensive analysis of the relevant jurisprudence, legal instruments, and scholarship surrounding arbitral practice with respect to the application of national law and international law. It investigates the awards in which tribunals referred to consistency between the legal orders, and suggests alternatives to the traditional doctrines of monism and dualism to explain the relationship between the national and the international legal order. The book also addresses the territorialized or internationalized nature of the tribunals; relevant choice-of-law rules and methodologies; and the scope of the arbitration agreement, including the possibility of host states presenting counterclaims in investment treaty arbitration. Ultimately, it argues that in investor–state arbitration, national and international law do not only coexist but may be applied simultaneously; they are also interdependent, each complementing and informing the other both indirectly and directly for a larger common good: enforcement of rights and obligations regardless of their national or international origin


Subject Law-
Author Elisabeth Kjos Hege
Published July 1, 2013
The Psychology of Becoming a Successful Worker : Research on the changing nature of achievement at work
The Psychology of Becoming a Successful Worker : Research on the changing nature of achievement at work

What is success at work and why is it important? How do top workers describe their success? How can work, community, leadership, family, or home and school promote success?

Success at work is often associated with career-oriented individuals who sacrifice other areas of life to achieve highly in the workplace, but success can also be defined in other ways. It can consist of feelings of knowledge, competence and accomplishment, stemming from an inner drive to work well and create an expression of mastery. This book focuses on employees who have been rewarded for their skills and expertise.

Based on the authors’ in-depth research into the phenomenon of success at work, this book provides a positive human-strength based approach to success and offers a fresh viewpoint to the modern, demanding and hectic work life. Drawing from the theory of positive psychology and outlining new theoretical ideas including work motivation, career orientation, work characteristics, and positive states of work, success is described as a combination of multiple elements which include other areas of life. The book is illustrated throughout with case studies from employees, and it will ignite thoughts about what success at work is and can be, and how to recognize factors which enhance or hinder success in varying contexts.

Considering a variety of data, this book will appeal to researchers and academics from the fields of work and organisational psychology, positive psychology, career counselling and coaching.


Subject Psychology-
Author Kaarina Maatta and Satu Uusiautti
Published July 11, 2014
Entrepreneurial Cognition: Exploring the Mindset of Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurial Cognition: Exploring the Mindset of Entrepreneurs
Turn-Taking in Human Communicative Interaction
Turn-Taking in Human Communicative Interaction

The core use of language is in face-to-face conversation. This is characterized by rapid turn-taking. This turn-taking poses a number central puzzles for the psychology of language. Consider, for example, that in large corpora the gap between turns is on the order of 100 to 300 ms, but the latencies involved in language production require minimally between 600ms (for a single word) or 1500 ms (for as simple sentence). This implies that participants in conversation are predicting the ends of the incoming turn and preparing in advance. But how is this done? What aspects of this prediction are done when? What happens when the prediction is wrong? What stops participants coming in too early? If the system is running on prediction, why is there consistently a mode of 100 to 300 ms in response time? The timing puzzle raises further puzzles: it seems that comprehension must run parallel with the preparation for production, but it has been presumed that there are strict cognitive limitations on more than one central process running at a time. How is this bottleneck overcome? Far from being 'easy' as some psychologists have suggested, conversation may be one of the most demanding cognitive tasks in our everyday lives. Further questions naturally arise: how do children learn to master this demanding task, and what is the developmental trajectory in this domain? Research shows that aspects of turn-taking such as its timing are remarkably stable across languages and cultures, but the word order of languages varies enormously. How then does prediction of the incoming turn work when the verb (often the informational nugget in a clause) is at the end? Conversely, how can production work fast enough in languages that have the verb at the beginning, thereby requiring early planning of the whole clause? What happens when one changes modality, as in sign languages -- with the loss of channel constraints is turn-taking much freer? And what about face-to-face communication amongst hearing individuals -- do gestures, gaze, and other body behaviors facilitate turn-taking? One can also ask the phylogenetic question: how did such a system evolve? There seem to be parallels (analogies) in duetting bird species, and in a variety of monkey species, but there is little evidence of anything like this among the great apes. All this constitutes a neglected set of problems at the heart of the psychology of language and of the language sciences. This research topic welcomes contributions from right across the board, for example from psycholinguists, developmental psychologists, students of dialogue and conversation analysis, linguists interested in the use of language, phoneticians, corpus analysts and comparative ethologists or psychologists. We welcome contributions of all sorts, for example original research papers, opinion pieces, and reviews of work in subfields that may not be fully understood in other subfields.


Subject Psychology-
Author Holler, Judith; Casillas, Marisa; H. Kendrick, Kobin; C. Levinson, Stephen
Published October 7, 2016
Assessment in Cognitive Therapy
Assessment in Cognitive Therapy
Law and the “Sharing Economy” : Regulating Online Market Platforms
Law and the “Sharing Economy” : Regulating Online Market Platforms
The Psychology of Human Thought : An Introduction
The Psychology of Human Thought : An Introduction
Re-Inventing Africa's Development:Linking Africa to the Korean Development Model
Re-Inventing Africa's Development:Linking Africa to the Korean Development Model
The Future Internet
The Future Internet
Spanish Economic Growth, 1850–2015
Spanish Economic Growth, 1850–2015
Infrastructure and Economic Growth in Asia
Infrastructure and Economic Growth in Asia
Economic Complexity and Human Development
Economic Complexity and Human Development
Economics of Land Degradation and Improvement – A Global Assessment for Sustainable Development
Economics of Land Degradation and Improvement – A Global Assessment for Sustainable Development
Computer and Information Sciences
Computer and Information Sciences
Language Technologies for the Challenges of the Digital Age
Language Technologies for the Challenges of the Digital Age
Cyber Security
Cyber Security
Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again Book
Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again Book
The Foundations of Chinese Medicine
The Foundations of Chinese Medicine

Han dynasty, 154 BC, North China. A peasant works in the millet fields in springtime. A bitterlycold North wind is blowing. In the afternoon after work, she has an itchy throat, a runny nose, a cough and a severe stiff neck and headache. She visits the local acupuncturist who diagnoses an invasion of exterior Wind-Cold. The acupuncturist inserts a few needles in the peasant's hands and applies cupping to two points in the upper back, which produces a marked improvement after a few hours.
AD 1988, London, England. A fund manager from the City of London suffers from anxiety and insomnia. He works long hours and under considerable pressure as he is responsible for themanagement of several million-pound funds. A colleague at work had tried acupuncture to stopsmoking and recommends him to his acupuncturist who diagnoses a case of Liver-Qi stagnationfrom the pressure of work. He inserts a few needles to remove the stagnation of Liver-Qi and calm the mind. After a few weekly treatments there is a considerable improvement.
Such is the awesome power of Chinese medicine that, even if it originated thousands of years ago and came to maturity a few hundred years before Christ, it can successfully diagnose and treat twentieth century health problems generated by a life-style which is light-years away from that of the ancient peasant society from which Chinese medicine originated.
Much is made of the cultural difference between the Chinese and Western societies. Of course, Chinese medicine arose out of China and therefore bears the cultural imprint of that society. Moreover, the way the theory of Chinese medicine is taught in modern China obviously reflects a materialistic approach. For example, the concept of Shen (the mental aspect of the Heart) is accepted, but not that of Hun or Po (the spiritual aspects of the Liver and Lungs). However, each society gives a particular imprint to the medicine they inherit. For example, Chinese herbal medicine during the Warring states period was mostly influenced by Daoist philosophy, whereas during the Han dynasty it was influenced by the Confucian and Legalist philosophies. During the Song dynasty, it was heavily influenced by the Neo-Confucian philosophy of the School of Principle (Li). Although the modern Chinese, with their materialistic philosophical orientation, have ignored or glossed over certain aspects of Chinese medicine, credit must be given to them for carrying out a useful and important sytematization of the theory of Chinese medicine. Moreover, we should not think that everything contained in the old classics is a pearl of wisdom. Even the greatest Chinese doctors such as Li Shi Zhen or Sun Si Miao clung to old superstitious beliefs and used some bizarre substances in their clinical practice. For example, Li Shi Zhen included the rope of a suicide victim as a medicinal "drug". 1 I feel we should be grateful for the work of modern Chinese doctors and teachers in sifting out such worthless aspects from the old classics.


Subject Medicine-
Author Giovanni Maciocia
Published October 23, 2009
What Would the Great Economists Do? How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve...
What Would the Great Economists Do? How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve...
The Meaning Revolution: Leading with the Power of Purpose
The Meaning Revolution: Leading with the Power of Purpose
Ask a Manager: How to Navigate Clueless Colleagues, Lunch ...
Ask a Manager: How to Navigate Clueless Colleagues, Lunch ...
When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
Internet of Things: Information Processing in an Increasingly Connected World
Internet of Things: Information Processing in an Increasingly Connected World
Advances in agronomy
Advances in agronomy
Principles of Agronomy
Principles of Agronomy
A textbook of agronomy
A textbook of agronomy
Where Have All the Textbooks Gone? Toward Sustainable Provision of Teaching and Learning Materials in Sub-Saharan Africa
Where Have All the Textbooks Gone? Toward Sustainable Provision of Teaching and Learning Materials in Sub-Saharan Africa
A Handbook for Curriculum Development and Teacher Training:The Language Dimension in all Subjects
A Handbook for Curriculum Development and Teacher Training:The Language Dimension in all Subjects
Equal Access to Education a peace imperative for Burundi
Equal Access to Education a peace imperative for Burundi
Educational Learning Theories
Educational Learning Theories
Education in Sub-Saharan Africa A Comparative Analysis
Education in Sub-Saharan Africa A Comparative Analysis
Basics in Education
Basics in Education
Pocket Book of Electrical Engineering Formulas
Pocket Book of Electrical Engineering Formulas
IET Wiring Regulations, Electric Wiring for Domestic Installers 16th Edition
IET Wiring Regulations, Electric Wiring for Domestic Installers 16th Edition
Neal Kinsey's Hands-On Agronomy: Neal Kinsey & Charles Walters
Neal Kinsey's Hands-On Agronomy: Neal Kinsey & Charles Walters
Scott McLean, Arizona Western College Education
Scott McLean, Arizona Western College Education